Wednesday, November 23, 2005

Blog-browsing bonuses

Enjoy these interesting spots from a little blog-browsing of mine.......

George Grant reminds us that today is St. Clement’s Day, the anniversary of Clement’s martyrdom and now celebrated as the first of the Holy Days. Grant calls us to “celebrate this day before Thanksgiving, in accord with Clement's legacy, with a renewed commitment to love well and live well to the glory of Christ.” Not failing to serve some desserts with his always nourishing meals of instruction, Grant posts the famous St. Clement’s Day Rhyme that we educators will find delightful to use in teaching Medieval history.

Gay go up and gay go down,
To ring the bells of London Town.
"Oranges and lemons," say the Bells of St. Clements;
"Bullseyes and targets," say the Bells of St. Margaret's;
"Brickbats and tiles," say the Bells of St. Giles;
"Halfpence and farthings," say the Bells of St. Martin's;
"Pancakes and fritters," say the Bells of St. Peter's;
"Two sticks and an apple," say the Bells of Whitechapel;
"Maids in white aprons," say the Bells at St. Katherine's;
"Pokers and tongs," say the Bells of St. John's;
"Kettles and pans," say the Bells of St. Anne's;
"Old father baldpate," say the slow Bells of Aldgate;
"You owe me ten shillings," say the Bells of St. Helen's;
"When will you pay me?" say the Bells of Old Bailey;
"When I grow rich," say the Bells of Shoreditch;
"Pray when will that be?" say the Bells of Stepney;
"I do not know," say the Great Bells of Bow;
Gay go up and gay go down,
To ring the bells of London Town.
Grant: "In a sense the rhyme is a tour of the old city of London--before the Great Fire of 1666--recounting the predominant trade, guild, and lore of the neighborhoods surrounding each of the churches (and bell towers). So for instance, St. Clement’s church was in Eastcheap where citrus fruit was unloaded at the nearby warves while St. Margaret’s on Lothbury Street was near an archery range, St. Giles at the Cripplegate Barbican was the center of the building trade, and St. Katherine Cree’s on Leadenhill Street was the site of the Leadenhill marketplace, etc. Who’d have ever thought that the sing-song chants of children through the ages would be so redolent in meaning?"

A copy of this is going into my Medieval notebook. What a fun resource this will be!
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Sparrow at Intent posts a beautiful autumn picture of a Laura Ingalls Wilder look-alike...
We who live in the quiet places have the opportunity
to become acquainted with ourselves,
to think our own thoughts and live our own lives
in a way that is not possible
for those who are keeping up with the crowd.
[Laura Ingalls Wilder]
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Semicolon posts her "Unfinished List of the 100 Best Fiction Books of All Time." I like Semicolon's spunky "I’ve been working on my list for quite some time, but TIME scooped me. Only their list wasn’t as good as mine, partly because they limited themselves to the twentieth century and this century. Also I have better taste."

I happened to glance at this quickly before leaving for the library the other afternoon. My book queue for the rest of the year (and beyond) is more than full, but when I saw she listed Olive Ann Burn's Cold Sassy Tree, I decided to pick it up at the library. Just maybe I'll get to and through it. (SS's end-of-the-year queue: finish The Divine Conspiracy and the ridiculous current Miss Julia book, Jothan's Journey, and The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe (re-read.)

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A couple of quotes from Scotwise

Let the mind of the Master be the master of your mind.
[unknown]

God's wonderful works which happen daily are lightly esteemed, not because they are of no import but because they happen so constantly and without interruption. Man is used to the miracle that God rules the world and upholds all creation, and because things daily run their appointed course, it seems insignificant, and no man thinks it worth his while to meditate upon it and to regard it as God's wonderful work, and yet it is a greater wonder than that Christ fed five thousand men with five loaves and made wine from water.
[Martin Luther]

Watch your thoughts; they become words.
Watch your words; they become actions.
Watch your actions; they become habits.
Watch your habits; they become character.
Watch your character; it becomes your destiny.
[Frank Outlaw]
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Read about the origins of the Thanksgiving hymn “We Gather Together".

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The Homeschooling Revolution passes on a quote from C.S. Lewis's stepson, Douglas Gresham, about home education as told to The Old Schoolhouse magazine:

"A child is best nurtured by having the one-on-one attention from each of the two parents for a specific period of time each day. Ideally, a child should be homeschooled by both parents sharing the task equally, though I do realize that this is not always possible. Bear in mind that I am not referring to idiotic parents, criminal parents, drug-addicted parents, or self-indulgent, self-obsessed parents, nor to anyone else who should never be graced (in my view, not God's, of course) with progeny in the first place. I am referring to normal, well-adjusted, good parents."
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Buried Treasure recounts one of her morning activities in "Oh Be Careful Little Mouth." Delightful to read, the account reminded me of two non-connected importances:
~~the high calling of daily reading the Scriptures, learning a hymn, and the all-too-often-ignored reading of the Westminister Confession of Faith to and with our children,
and,
~~that "Monday is the day filled with the most promise, like New Year’s Day every week, a fresh start. That’s the day we go like gangbusters."
I like that term "gangbusters." Though I've not used that term, that's my thought about New Year's Day. And Mondays. I'm preparing a mental list of personal gangbusters for 2006. Don't wait until December 31 to think about your list. I further blogpost about this topic later.

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Browse
Buried Treasure’s list of Books on Books.
I cannot let myself look at this yet or my entire day will be waylaid.


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Finally, see these adorable, and virtually realistic, miniature babies made out of polymar clay.



1 comment:

tonia/sparrow said...

I will tell my daughter that you think she's a Laura-look-alike. That ought to get another smile out of her! :)